gt vs rr head to head Calculating the semi-bluff raise before the flop is quite simple.

gt vs rr head to head Calculating the semi-bluff raise before the flop is quite simple.

gt vs rr head to head Calculating the semi-bluff raise before the flop is quite simple. The amount you raise = the risk you accept. The profit you expect to win = the current pot amount. If your opponent calls (does not reraise), your hand will still have value. , because you have a good chance of catching a flop. [Odds of everyone folding × (bet + pot amount)] + [(odds of one or more opponents calling but not raising) × (value of your hand on face)]> Bet of You So when the above formula is correct, raising and selling bluffs before your group stage will be profitable. “The value of your hand at the flop” means how much this hand is worth after seeing the flop (i.e. expected value). This value is of course calculated based on the current amount of the bet. So, which hand should you use to sell the bluff? In general, you should choose the best hands among the hands you don’t usually play to maximize the value of your hand on the flop according to the above formula. For example, if an opponent has a lot of chips and plays aggressively and often raises very loosely and you hope to steal the pot from him with a half-bluff, you think that if you reraise, his reaction will be: fold. the hand is weaker than the hand, Go all-in with your strongest hand and call with the rest. For example, you think that following with QJ will be profitable, but following with Q8 is not profitable (of course, following with 72o is definitely not profitable). In this case, Q8 is the hand you should use as a semi-bluff hand. Q8 is already the strongest of these hands and has no value (or negative expected value), so compare with 72o, Q8 should be used semi-bluffing. because the hand would actually be worth more if called.

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